Support The Arts Sunday

We’re so excited to share some amazing makers with you from our first Support Sunday! Supporting and promoting independent and small businesses is so important to us, and in this series we will be giving you a deeper insight into their their practice and their amazing work!

Meet our first artist, @brushandbloomstudio. A London-based fine art studio specialising in Giclee Prints and Fine Art Watercolours:

What is your process for creating your work, tell us a bit more about how you go from idea to final piece
 Inspiration comes from my encounters with nature, from the intricacies of local wildflowers to the drama of mountainside adventures. Once I have made detailed studies and creative experiments, I begin to carefully research the suppliers and materials for my products with sustainability at the forefront. 

What’s your set up at home, are you able to remain creative?
My workspace and living space have always been intertwined, which reflect the overlap of my creative passions and identity as an artist. Time blocking, anchor points and scheduling family time has with productivity (but it’s a work in progress!)

Have you got any tips for remaining creative and promoting your business during lockdown?
Setting several long term goals and core values has helped me to adapt to the circumstances whilst remaining consistent – it’s ok if the journey doesn’t take you the route you expect!

What are you plans for the future and have you got anything exciting coming up for us to look out for?
 I’m excited for upcoming markets and opportunities to engage with clients in person, as well as new products in the works for Autumn 2020!

Discover more from this artist on their Instagram or on their Website

Next up, @katieiacovouceramics. Cornwall based Ceramicist inspired by texture, nature and forever changing landscape:

What is your process for creating your work, tell us a bit more about how you go from idea to final piece
I generally have an idea in my head and immediately attempt to make it. Occasionally I draw what I’d like to make and brainstorm ideas allowing the initial idea to grow on paper, however I don’t do this often. I like the fluidity of the making process, as the initial idea can change a lot. For me this is part of the creative process and I enjoy the freedom that clay allows.

What’s your set up at home, are you able to remain creative?
I have a studio in my London home which I set up three years ago. I did my degree at Falmouth College of Arts, in Cornwall and after a long break due to work and family commitments, I decided to start making again. Having a family and working from my garden studio works well around family life and also during lockdown.

Have you got any tips for remaining creative and promoting your business during lockdown?
During lockdown I have been able to sell more than I’ve ever sold before due to fantastic online initiatives by Morley College, various online Craft Fairs and the Artist Support Pledge created my Matthew Burrows.
I think now is the time to create a strong online presence by joining in with various online craft fairs and constantly making and developing your skill and producing new fresh work to show. I’d say it’s important to constantly connect with other makers within your field to build a great network.  It’s networking online basically not in the flesh anymore!

What are you plans for the future and have you got anything exciting coming up for us to look out for?
At the moment I don’t have any craft fairs or market events planned due to covid, although I do miss meeting the general public and having that human connection. I will be working on my website and I’ll try to get that up and running soon. New work and updates are put on my Instagram account and I also have a Facebook and Twitter account.
Members of the public are currently sending me direct messages should they wish to make any purchases or have any enquiries.

Discover more from this artist on their Instagram, Twitter, Facebook or on their Website (still under construction)

Finally, @mamimutokyo. Japanese designer/artist in London on a mission to inject optimism into the world:

What is your process for creating your work, tell us a bit more about how you go from idea to final piece
I love turning everyday inspiration into playful patterns that evoke an emotional response.
My inspiration comes from seemingly mundane such as manhole covers, swimming pool and store shutters. Rather than just illustrating them, I extract the texture, colours and emotion and turn them into joyful design.

What’s your set up at home, are you able to remain creative?
Just me, my laptop and my imagination. With plenty of family life in the mix. Remaining creative is touch but not impossible.

What are you tips for remaining creative and promoting your business during lockdown?
Collaboration. My latest series “Lockdown Mindscape” was born out of my struggle to get inspired in lockdown. Admitting my physical and creative limitation, I asked 11 people in 11 global location to send me their physical and introspective views. The result is a series of bilingual motion posters to document how we are experiencing Covid-19 in different stages in different locations. More on my website www.mamimutokyo.com

What are you plans for the future and have you got anything exciting coming up for us to look out for?
I am pushing to get more commissions with brands. If you are a brand who can benefit from injecting optimism into your products with my joyful design, please get in touch.

Discover more from this artist on their Instagram or on their Website

Come back next week as we share even more artists and their practices